MPLS Circuit Troubleshooting

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In this scenario we are asked to validate a flapping interface.  

1] Find the serial interface and verify that it is up/up

 attga43c3#sho ip int br | include 10.112.210.45

 Serial9/1/1/20:0       10.112.210.45   YES manual up

2] Display the interface and note the errors

    attga43c3#sho int s9/1/1/20:0

        Serial9/1/1/20:0 is up, line protocol is up
          Hardware is cyBus 2CT3+
          Description: MNX | MYHOME SERVICES | MYHOUSE | GA | DHEC.123456..ATI | 23853 | 1305937 | 1364629 | USA | MIS |
          Internet address is 10.112.210.45/30
          MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1536 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255
          Encapsulation PPP, crc 16, loopback not set
          Keepalive set (10 sec)
          LCP Open
          Listen: CDPCP
          Open: IPCP
          Last input 00:00:05, output 00:00:05, output hang never
          Last clearing of “show interface” counters never
          Input queue: 0/1000/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 5
          Queueing strategy: VIP-based fair queuing
          5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
          5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
             6534487 packets input, 3035189030 bytes, 0 no buffer
             Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 1 giants, 0 throttles
             116987 input errors, 7228 CRC, 51274 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 58484 abort
             5877595 packets output, 2144676741 bytes, 0 underruns
             0 output errors, 0 collisions, 170 interface resets
             0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
             166 carrier transitions no alarm present
          Timeslot(s) Used: 1-24, Transmitter delay is 0 flags, transmit queue length 5
          non-inverted data

3] Find the VRF and ping the VRF interface.

    attga43c3#sho ip vrf interface | include 10.112.210.45

        Serial9/1/1/20:0       12.112.210.45   1612 <— VRF

4] Run an extended Ping to the VRF

    Router3#ping vrf 1612   

        Protocol [ip]:
        Target IP address: 10.112.210.46
        Repeat count [5]: 5000
        Datagram size [100]: 1500
        Timeout in seconds [2]: 1
        Extended commands [n]:
        Sweep range of sizes [n]:
        Type escape sequence to abort.
        Sending 5000, 1500-byte ICMP Echos to 10.112.210.46, timeout is 1 seconds:
        !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

In the above ping I wanted to really hammer the heck out of circuit.  In this example we see that the circuit is clocking massive input errors and  no output. Instead of me writing what I did to correct this, I’m going to leave this post open for the reader to comment what they think I did.  Note the bold errors and circuit type.

And the Last 5 blocks of IPv4 /8 go to…

Keep moving along folks there is really nothing to see here….  nothing really new to report here, people always said the end was near, the real news is that they thought this day would have taken place 8 years earlier.  ..  below is my brief editorial of what took place Feb 3 2011.

**

AfricNIC, APNIC, ARIN, LacNIC and the last of the last goes to RIpeNCC

http://www.nro.net/media-center/video-archive-3-february-2011 < video press conference here.

Side note, APNIC has half of the worlds population and the majority of the IP4 addresses.

APNIC walked away with three /8 blocks (2 which were received earlier this year)and predict that it will hand them all out within the next 3 to 6 months.

A side note;

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OSPF Stubby & Totally Stubby, explained

OSPF (Open Shortest Path First) has many configurable topologies. One of being the  Stubby Area,  as if that didn’t confuse you enough they introduced  the Totally Stubby Area when this was first explain to me, I couldn’t grasp the concept of what the instructor was talking about, at least not until I drew the network out and configured it out in GNS3, it was then I was able to seen it for myself.

FYI OSPF overview, stubby networks only used for a small area that need to block all the external routes in their routing table.   Routing will show a default internal route pointing to their ABR. Generally in the OSPF world all things must connect to Area 0, the ISP link would normally flow out Area 0 ASBR  I think of Area 0 as the OSPF body and other area as limbs (the analogy works for me). Click topology for larger pic.

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EIGRP query messages, the good the bad the ugly.

If a network goes down, EIGRP will send out query messages to its neighbors to find an alternate route.  EIGRP will do this for 180 seconds (three minutes) it will keep sending the query messages even if a path is reported within that time frame, the path will simply set in queue until all queries have been answered.   While this message waits the link can become “stuck in active” and after the 3 minute period all neighbor relations will be torn down and the link will become active, afterward the rest of the neighbor relations are restored.

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What I got from a typo with the Cisco show command.

While working on another article dealing with telnet and SSH.  I ran across a command I never used or seen before.   Originally I wanted see the configuration for line console and typed out “show run line console 0” but instead, for some reason or another I hit the enter key after I typed “sho run line” and saw this.

ConfigBytes#sho run line
Building configuration…
Current configuration : 1034 bytes
1 : !
2 : version 12.4
3 : service timestamps debug datetime msec
4 : service timestamps log datetime msec

5 : no service password-encryption
6 : !
7 : hostname ConfigBytes
8 : !
9 : boot-start-marker
10 : boot-end-marker
11 : !
12 : logging buffered 4096 emergencies
13 : !
14 : no aaa new-model
15 : memory-size iomem 5
16 : ip cef
17 : !
18 : !
19 : !
20 : !
21 : no ip domain lookup

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New CCNP Books

Yesterday I received my new CCNP books from Cisco Press.  Surprisingly the price was not that bad what I got.  All three courses, 642- 902, 813 and the 832.  I opt for Certs Kits for each as well.

The complete course was around $250 which includes the “Official Certification Guides” , Cert Kits and shipping.

The Cert Kits includes a Quick Reference booklets, flash cards (found online) and a DVD. Each DVD in the same familiar format as the the Video Mentor series is, each with an introduction and roughly 5 to 6 hours of video, each covering the the material talk about in the Certification Guides.

This is makes this series stand out is that the Cert Kits complement the Cert Guides.  I would recommend that you buy them both.  While scanning through the new material I notice that this time Cisco is really pushing hard on the routing and switching.  They have left a lot of the VOiP and security out, which was found in the ONT (642-845) and ISCW (642-825) tracks.

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